New Zealand Mountan Safety Council

Canterbury

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Issued at 25/06/2017 9:24pm. Valid till 26/06/2017 6pm

Mt Hutt

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
Report TutorialPrint Reporthear report

Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
9am - 5pm
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
The wind speeds predicted over the next 1-2 days will move the soft storm snow around in areas that might be triggered by backcountry travellers.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
1
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
9am - 5pm
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
The storm snow from Friday and Saturday will be moved in a manner which eliminates concern based on the wind and direction (slopes facing to the North through Northwest will be decreased over time).

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
Small areas of loose and dry storm snow were triggered only by skier/snowboarder tracks. The resulting avalanche activity was small and not incredibly hazardous. Stay tuned for rapidly changing conditions, as this avalanche activity only represents the recent findings and not the changes that might be seen in the next 1-2 days.

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
A soft, new snow layer rests upon a variety of frozen layers, each with a poorly developed snow structure (weak, poor bonding, imagine a type of snow that will not make a snowball). Currently, these layers are not a problem. However, the coming wind event will easily move the soft snow to new areas and add the extra weight to surely test the strength of our poorly formed snowpack.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
A dry and relatively windy Northwest flow will move snow around (to areas facing towards the South and Southeast). Sky cover should be relatively clear and temperatures will be mild.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Sliding Danger

Slide For Life
Thin snowpack is a continuing worry. caution should be used when planning entrances and exits in any backcountry zone.

Forecast by Luke Ochs

Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche Center