New Zealand Mountan Safety Council

Fiordland

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Issued at 23/07/2017 11:13am. Valid till 26/07/2017 6pm

Fiordland

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
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Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
3
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Gale SE quarter winds over the last two days have transported any available snow to the Lee. Expected stiff wind slabs in the Northern half aspects above 1500m, watch for steep terrain leading off ridge lines and under sheltered cliff bands lower down or mid slope. the warmer temps today will start the consolidation process, however more time will be needed. Best to stick to low angle terrain, and watch for steep loaded slopes above and think about your run out. through Monday night and Tuesday Fiordland is expecting heavy rain out of the NW with an FL of around 1600m during the main pulse. This will create extra stress to the existing wind slabs below 1600m.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
3
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Watch for isolated pockets of snow in shady aspects above 1700m. if the surface / top 20-60cm of the snow pack seems stiff or wind loaded think what it is sitting on. Multiple layers of Facets, depth / and / or buried surface hoar exists around 60-120cm deep. we have had very little wind loading / wind slab formation (pre Tuesday the 11th). Perfect facet crystal growing conditions. The last three snow storms have been out of the NW, latest one has delivered 40cm of snow above 1700m, Warmer rain last week did help some of the shallower pockets release out of the southern aspects below 1700m.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
No reports or observations lately, a small size two wet slab was sighted on our Mckinnon Web cam (Thursday). looks to have come out of a southern aspect around 1700m.

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
Below 1500m the snow pack is thin and very little snow exists below 1100m.
Above we have had a thin snow pack till last week, In the shady aspect we have had perfect facet growth, which is now buried by the latest two snow storms out of the NW, 20cm and 60cm (16th July). the latest snow fell with light to moderate winds. and slow and steady. so we are expecting that this Persistent weak layer has become quietly buried at around 60-120cm deep.
Of late the snow pack below 1700m has had a small amount of rain which is unlikely to have peculated down to these layers deeper in the pack. Gale SE over the last two days have transported available snow to the Northern half aspects.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
The SE has now abated, and the Warmer NW has kicked in, light rain possible tonight with a FL around 1300m.
Monday will see Continuing NW with 50-70mm foretasted rain, FL around 1200m.
Tuesday changing to westerlies and the FL is set to drop to 600m.






MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Forecast by Adrian Braaksma

Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche Center