New Zealand Mountan Safety Council

Fiordland

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Issued at 24/07/2016 11:24am. Valid till 27/07/2016 6pm

Fiordland

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
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Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
3
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
In the past 24 hours the upper slopes have received new snow associated with gale winds from the NW, and heavy rain at lower elevations. There is now a significant amount of snow falling to lower levels 1000m. This will be landing on a mixture of surfaces. This includes hard wind crusts and rain crusts, and higher elevations dense wind slab. The bond between layers is likely to be weak. As the snow accumulates the storm slab danger will increase.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
3
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
The heavy snowfall yesterday and today will be adding a lot of weight to the snowpack and testing suspected weak layers lingering within the pack from early season. This is probably most likely at high elevations on shady slopes. Anything triggered may run a long way, into gullies and over bluffs.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
No recent observations. Storm conditions and poor visibility

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
Above 1700m ish, pockets of wind slab sit on potentially weak layers from the early season. Over 2.5 meters of wind battered snow is likely to have fallen on the high slopes, last week. This has left a layer of stiff winds lab on a rain crust, particularly on high shady (S and SE) slopes. Windward slopes are scoured back to the crust. With the freezing level fluctuating, rain has soaked through the pack, possibly up to 170mm. New snow from the NW and W is accumulating now.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
Heavy snow falls on Sunday down to 500m at times, and easing in the evening. Strong to gale westerly's. Showers clear to the coast on Monday afternoon. The next front comes in from the NW on Tuesday.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Forecast by Brenda George

Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche Center